GOLDEN ETERNITY


Poems are the world asleep
where death cannot reside


March 10, 2002:

On the eve Jack Kerouac's Birthday (March 11), Philomene reads
aloud to John from Kerouac's Scriptures of Golden Eternity. This is their
last conversation at THE ELLISON in Venice, California. John Thomas
passed away on Good Friday, March 29 at 2:56 pm.


Philomene:

We became gods together, John
Not saints, not buddhas, but gods
And they can be cantankerous
The old Greek gods,
the Muse: cantankerous

John:

I never wanted to be either one
a buddha or a saint

Philomene:

We became poets

John:

That's right

Philomene:

And that's better than all of them

John:

Of course

John:

And must you be a buddha to experience
Jack Kerouac's Golden Eternity, or a saint?

Philomene:

I never was

John:

And Golden Eternity, if you were a buddha, would be nothing
It would not be conscious awareness of self as being

Philomene:

You're saying that doesn't die after your body dies?

John:

I once wrote a little poem:

I know that my body will die
I know that my mind will die
I know that my soul will die
But not me.

Philomene:

Nor the poems - they won't die

John:

It's taken for granted the poems won't die
Don't even have to think about that
They'd be harder to get rid of than crab grass

Philomene:

Yes

John:

And we're not dying
We're all there is
and we're going to live forever

Philomene:

Can I bring Golden Eternity with me?

John:

Which, if it's Jack Kerouac's Golden Eternity,
is the color of beer or muscatel
Yes, just as long as it doesn't fill the house

Philomene:

Dear, it IS the house

John:

Then you don't have to bring it with you
it's already there So what's your problem?

Philomene:

No problem - The end
Whatever, wherever it is
it's Golden Eternity

(C) 2003 - Philomene Long / John Thomas